21. Student. Irish. Writer. Dreamer.

 

"My response to the “I am not a feminist” internet phenomenon….

First of all, it’s clear you don’t know what feminism is. But I’m not going to explain it to you. You can google it. To quote an old friend, “I’m not the feminist babysitter.”

But here is what I think you should know.

You’re insulting every woman who was forcibly restrained in a jail cell with a feeding tube down her throat for your right to vote, less than 100 years ago.

You’re degrading every woman who has accessed a rape crisis center, which wouldn’t exist without the feminist movement.

You’re undermining every woman who fought to make marital rape a crime (it was legal until 1993).

You’re spitting on the legacy of every woman who fought for women to be allowed to own property (1848). For the abolition of slavery and the rise of the labor union. For the right to divorce. For women to be allowed to have access to birth control (Comstock laws). For middle and upper class women to be allowed to work outside the home (poor women have always worked outside the home). To make domestic violence a crime in the US (It is very much legal in many parts of the world). To make workplace sexual harassment a crime.

In short, you know not what you speak of. You reap the rewards of these women’s sacrifices every day of your life. When you grin with your cutsey sign about how you’re not a feminist, you ignorantly spit on the sacred struggle of the past 200 years. You bite the hand that has fed you freedom, safety, and a voice.

In short, kiss my ass, you ignorant little jerks.”

The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.

In her cover essay on silencing women in the October 2014 issue of Harper’s, Rebecca Solnit once again proves that she is one of our era’s greatest essayist – further evidence here and here. (via explore-blog)

showslow:

© Ryan McGinley's Ad Campaign for Edun (2012) | Video

Six species of African butterflies flutter about the tattooed torso of Bradley Soileau and the candy floss-colored hair of Charlotte Free in artist Ryan McGinley’s dynamic video portraits for Edun’s Spring 2012 campaign. Set to the soulful gospel of “If I Had A Little Love” by the Majestic Arrows, McGinley’s playful scenes of butterflies decorating the fingers, shoulders and cheekbones of a luminous cast of young models are punctuated with key pieces from the collection. (x)

saltysojourn:

"Mad women fight back"; "Bet your ass we’re paranoid" - Psychiatric survivors during a protest in 1976

saltysojourn:

"Mad women fight back"; "Bet your ass we’re paranoid" - Psychiatric survivors during a protest in 1976

Someone calling a white person ‘wonder bread’ isn’t racist. It’s rude, but it’s not racist. Wonder bread as an offensive term has no weight, no meaning. It’s just something to push your buttons. Using the N-word is racist - it has meaning and weight and brings up a past that should’ve never happened. The comparison between rude and racist is like squares and rectangles - every square is a rectangle, but not every rectangle is a square. Every racist comment you hear is rude, but not every rude comment you hear is racist.

from an in-class debate about white supremacy (via seehowtame)

I love women,” coming from a man, almost always means “I love when women please me,” “I love to imagine fucking women,” “I love to jack off to women’s pornified bodies,” “I love women who don’t challenge me in a way that makes me uncomfortable,” or “I love the idea of women.

silent-wordsmith:

mollymimieux:

Imagine that one day the whole world would look like this.

We don’t belong here; we never have

(Source: boredpanda.com)